Vision Quiz

Have you observed any of the following symptoms with your student(s) and/or have they reported any of them to you?  Please mark the symptoms that occur frequently with two checks and those that occur occasionally with one check.

15+ points: Consult with a developmental optometrist at Vision & Conceptual Development Center

15-20= Possible functional vision problems.

20-30= Probable functional vision problems.

Over 30= Definite functional vision problems.

Score 3 points each for items 1-34 Score 2 points each for items 35-41 Score 1 point each for items 42-47 Score Double points for every item with two checks.

  1. ___Skips lines while reading or copying                 

  2. ___Loses place while reading or copying               

  3. ___Skips words while reading or copying                              

  4. ___Substitutes words while reading or copying

  5. ___Rereads words or lines

  6. ___Reverses letters, numbers or words

  7. ___Uses a finger or marker to keep place while reading/writing

  8. ___Reads very slowly

  9. ___Poor reading comprehension

10. ___Difficulty remembering what has been read

11. ___Holds head too close when reading/writing (within 7-8 in.)

12. ___Squints, closes, or covers one eye while reading

13. ___Unusual posture/head tilt when reading/writing

14. ___Headaches following intense reading/computer work

15. ___Eyes hurt or feel tired after completing a visual task

16. ___Feels unusually tired after completing a visual task

17. ___Double vision

18. ___Vision blurs at distance when looks up from near work

19. ___Letters or lines “run together” or words “jump” when reading

20. ___Print seems to move or go in and out of focus when reading

21. ___Poor spelling skills

22. ___Writing is crooked or poorly spaced

23. ___Misaligns letters or numbers

24. ___ Makes errors copying

25. ___ Difficulty tracking moving objects

26. ___ Unusual clumsiness, poor coordination

27. ___ Difficulty with sports involving good eye-hand coordination

28. ___ Eye turns in or out

29. ___ Sees more clearly with one eye than the other

  1. ___Skips lines while reading or copying                 

  2. ___Loses place while reading or copying               

  3. ___Skips words while reading or copying                              

  4. ___Substitutes words while reading or copying

  5. ___Rereads words or lines

  6. ___Reverses letters, numbers or words

  7. ___Uses a finger or marker to keep place while reading/writing

  8. ___Reads very slowly

  9. ___Poor reading comprehension

10. ___Difficulty remembering what has been read

11. ___Holds head too close when reading/writing (within 7-8 in.)

12. ___Squints, closes, or covers one eye while reading

13. ___Unusual posture/head tilt when reading/writing

14. ___Headaches following intense reading/computer work

15. ___Eyes hurt or feel tired after completing a visual task

16. ___Feels unusually tired after completing a visual task

17. ___Double vision

18. ___Vision blurs at distance when looks up from near work

19. ___Letters or lines “run together” or words “jump” when reading

20. ___Print seems to move or go in and out of focus when reading

21. ___Poor spelling skills

22. ___Writing is crooked or poorly spaced

23. ___Misaligns letters or numbers

24. ___ Makes errors copying

25. ___ Difficulty tracking moving objects

26. ___ Unusual clumsiness, poor coordination

27. ___ Difficulty with sports involving good eye-hand coordination

28. ___ Eye turns in or out

29. ___ Sees more clearly with one eye than the other

30. ___ Feels sleepy while reading

31.___ Visual perceptual or visual processing problems

___Difficulty with visual memory or visual sequencing

___Difficulty with visual-spatial concepts

___Directional confusion

___Impaired performance with copying

___Deficits in visual processing speed

32.___ Visual motor integration disorders

33.___ Non-Verbal Learning disorders

34.___ Performance scores not comparable to verbal scores

35. ___ Dislikes tasks requiring sustained concentration

36. ___ Avoids near tasks such as reading

37. ___ Confuses right and left directions

38. ___ Becomes restless when working at his/her desk

39. ___ Tends to lose awareness of surroundings when concentrating

40. ___ Must “feel” things to see them

41. ___ Carsickness

42. ___ Eyes bothered by light

43. ___ Unusual blinking

44. ___ Unusual eye rubbing

45. ___ Dry eyes

46. ___ Watery eyes

47. ___ Red eyes

Virtual VT?

Stay motivated– new activities to keep interest high
Stay accountable– your vision therapist will keep you on task
Stay healthy– we have all kinds of knowledge to keep your vision in tip-top shape:

  • Reduce headaches
  • Improve eye-hand-body coordination
  • Improve visual processing skills
  • Improve near-far focusing skills
  • Counteract all that extra screen time 

“I have found that receiving virtual therapy sessions have kept us motivated and invested in a successful outcome.”   -Lisa F.

Who We Are

Amanda Zeller Manley, OD, FCOVD

Neuro-developmental Optometrist, Fellow of the College of Optometrists in Vision Development

Passion: That kids and adults don’t get roadblocked by their visual system. Helping kids and adults stop feeling stupid by improving their visual system, from eyeball to brain to body.

WhyUntil becoming a patient at her optometry college’s vision therapy clinic, Dr. Zeller struggled to be a solid B-minus student. After vision therapy, she was finally able to become the A student her parents had always expected. She also has had a few concussions that had visual consequences later improved through vision rehabilitation. Her personal experiences provide common ground with her patients and their own struggles. Combined with over a thousand hours of specialty continuing education, sixteen years in the clinic have provided ample opportunity to meet patients where they are in order to provide a custom path to vision rehabilitation.

Board Certified in Vision Therapy and Vision Development, College of Optometrists in Vision Development (COVD); Doctor of Optometry (OD), Nova Southeastern University College of Optometry.

Member of the Neuro-Optometric Rehabilitation Association (NORA); College of Optometrists in Vision Development (COVD); Maryland Optometric Association; American Optometric Association

Mehrnaz Azimi Green, OD, FCOVD

Neuro-developmental Optometrist, Fellow of the College of Optometrists in Vision Development, DIR-FCD Certified Profectum Professional in Developmental Optometry, Intermediate DIR Floortime Provider

Passion: Getting kids with autism and other special needs the vision care they need, while providing an opportunity for visual growth.

Board Certified in Vision Therapy and Vision Development, College of Optometrists in Vision Development (COVD); Doctor of Optometry (OD), Nova Southeastern University College of Optometry.

Member of the Neuro-Optometric Rehabilitation Association (NORA); College of Optometrists in Vision Development (COVD); Maryland Optometric Association; American Optometric Association

What does vision have to do with thinking?

 

If you think your visual system might be keeping you from reaching your potential, give us a call today at 301-951-0320. Our team members happy to answer your questions and help you decide if a visual cognitive evaluation is your next best step.

What We Do

Download a complete symptoms checklist

pexels-photo-1257110

Photo by Daria Shevtsova on Pexels.com

At the Vision & Conceptual Development Center we are dedicated exclusively to developmental optometry.  We work to help our patients develop the visual skills necessary for success in life.   People come from all over the world as well as the local Washington D.C. area.

The Vision & Conceptual Development Center is known world-wide for the work we do helping patients who are developmentally challenged.  Whether your child is on the autism spectrum or has other challenges, we have found that visual development deficits are often playing a role in the child’s difficulties.   We have helped children with a wide variety of challenges overcome their vision problems and lead happier and more productive lives.

In addition to helping children, we also treat adults with a variety of eye-coordination vision problems such as amblyopia (lazy eye), strabismus (eye turn), convergence insufficiency (a condition where the two eyes don’t aim properly at close distances causing blurry or doubled images), computer vision syndrome, or other vision problems which have occurred as the result of a brain injury such as a stroke or accident.

The Vision & Conceptual Development Center is unique in offering vision therapies specifically designed to treat visuo-cognitive delays (visual problems which interfere with cognitive function).  While we work with all children and all children’s vision problems, our specialty is in working with visuo-cognitive difficulties, often described as visuo-spatial, visual perceptual, or visual processing problems. These are areas of visual functioning that take place in the mind and brain rather than in the eyes, so a person with “20/20” eyesight may have visuo-cognitive deficits.

We tailor our approach and our therapeutic regime to your child’s particular needs, designed specifically to address and to remedy his or her condition in the most positive and nurturing way possible. All vision therapy is performed in a one-to-one setting, customized by our doctors for your child.

Visuo-cognitive delays can easily be misdiagnosed as learning disabilities or other developmental delays.  VIsuo-cognitive delays can also accompany other developmental delays.  Some of the symptoms that demonstrate that your child may have a visuo-cognitive delay are:

  • Difficulty putting thoughts on paper (words or drawings)
  • Higher Verbal/ lower Performance IQ scores
  • Lack of organization, for example, is able to do the homework but can’t find it to turn it in or doesn’t know how to start a simple task.
  • Frequently says “I can’t” before trying
  • Poor understanding of personal space, for example:  a “close talker,” bumps into people or stands very close to people.
  • Being “lost in space”, for example: confused, distressed or overly excitable in a large, open environment such as a sports stadium, gymnasium or shopping mall.
  • Constantly touching the walls or furniture
  • Difficulty understanding visually presented classroom work
  • Poor ability to follow instructions (i.e. poor sequencing)

Download a comprehensive symptoms checklist

The types of improvements one can expect vary depending on the depth of the problem.  Once the vision problems are corrected patients often experience life changing improvements.

For more information or to schedule an appointment, please call 301-951-0320.

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